01.30
2019

The Importance of the Trucking Industry

The trucking industry is the backbone of the economy in the United States. With so much of the country’s goods transported across the U.S. in trucks, the industry is invaluable to the country. Nearly 70% of all the freight tonnage moved in the U.S. goes on trucks. This amounts to about 10.5 million tons moved each year, transported via some 3.5 million heavy-duty trucks that consume around 39 billion gallons of diesel fuel in the process. Needless to say, the trucking industry is a huge operation.

To keep America going the trucking industry needs everything to be reliable. Everything from the brakes to vehicle maintenance, knowing who’s behind the wheel of each vehicle to where each vehicle is at all time, is vital for all the fleet managers across the country to stay on top of. The industry calls for reliability in many different areas. We bring reliability to all different parts of a fleet.

With our solutions, company owners can set up maintenance alerts on vehicles. Having the ability to set up notifications for eliminates the guesswork for which ones need to be serviced and what specifically needs to be worked on. These alerts are a part of the reporting feature and can be included in a regular report emailed to management.

The alerts can be set up far in advance or created as needed, and they become even more helpful when used in conjunction with other alerts that keep management aware of driving behavior. Administration receives alerts when vehicles are excessively idling, speeding, hard accelerating or braking, in unauthorized locations, and if used off hours.

Knowing all the details of a vehicle’s usage helps decision-makers know if vehicle A should get a tire rotation, if vehicle B should be in line for a battery check, or if vehicle C needs some more coolant, all before the check-engine light comes on.

Our solutions do much more than just keep fleet owners on top of when their vehicles should be serviced. They provide a clear insight into the daily happenings within their fleet. They allow management to track the location of vehicles with GPS precision, set up alerts such as speeding and hard braking, and to know when a vehicle travels outside of a designated area. These notifications and metrics are put together in a report that can be viewed when needed or can be sent as a reoccurring report.

There are issues with fleets that even the best driver might let slip through the cracks, like idling, which can account for up to eight percent of fuel costs. For perspective, a truck that spends $70,000 a year on fuel is spending $5,600 of that on idling. Just ten seconds of idling uses more fuel than restarting the engine. Our solutions report idling to ensure every ounce of fuel is put toward getting the job done.

At Actsoft, we provide reliability throughout your fleet.

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01.09
2019

Commercial Motor Vehicle Medical Certificates

Commercial motor vehicle (CMV) drivers have long had to comply with various safety precautions to ensure they’re alert on the road during long drives and amid poor driving conditions. One of these mandates is a clean bill of health.

The National Registry of Medical Examiners was created to reduce highway accidents according to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). Requiring CMV drivers to have up-to-date medical certificates is based on various reports, such as National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) crash investigations, which indicates that improper medical certification of CMV drivers with serious disqualifying medical conditions has directly contributed to fatal and injury crashes.

A school bus and truck collision in New Jersey illustrates the importance of certified medical examiners, according to the NTSB. The school bus driver involved in the crash received his medical certification in January 2012, before medical examiners were required to have training. The FMCSA had no regulatory authority over the examining doctor, there were no federal training or certification programs to ensure that examiners were familiar with the regulations, and there was no national registry of examiners. However, examiners were expected to exercise good medical judgment and carefully evaluate each person on whom they performed a physical examination (Herner, Smedvy, and Ysander 1966).

According to the investigation, in this case, the medical examiner, a chiropractor, never saw the school bus driver before and did not obtain medical records or consults from the driver’s primary care and specialist doctors. The extent to which the medical examiner verbally discussed the driver’s chronic low back pain and diagnosis of alcoholism (and alcohol abuse), which are underlying potentially disqualifying conditions, is not known. Moreover, it is unknown to what extent he discussed the prescription medications he was aware of, even though he wrote on the commercial driver’s license (CDL) form that they do not interfere with driving. Therefore, the NTSB concludes that the CDL medical examiner did not thoroughly evaluate the school bus driver for medical conditions that could have disqualified him from receiving a CDL. The NTSB also concludes that based on the school bus driver’s combination of medical conditions and use of multiple prescription medications, it is likely that he would not have been medically certified to drive a school bus if he had fully disclosed his medical history on the CDL medical certification.
While it’s impossible to know what a driver’s habits are on a daily basis, it’s crucial to put measures in place to ensure the safety of vehicles and passengers on roadways, as illustrated by the New Jersey crash.

Along with required medical examinations by now-certified medical examiners, as well as the newly passed Hours of Service legislation, there are other measures companies themselves can institute to ensure driver safety. GPS tracking has long been a popular tool to maintain watch of driver behavior — which would have been impossible pre-technology. Now, for pennies a day, fleet-based companies, or any business who uses drivers to deliver services or goods, can monitor a host of behaviors.

What can I monitor?

  • Driver speeds
  • Idling
  • Fast braking
  • Travel outside of authorized areas
  • Rapid acceleration

Each of these behaviors can be set up to alert managers and office personnel so that a driver can be notified that they are breaking a rule and must modify their behavior before an accident or other liability happens. Moreover, weekly or monthly reports can be created to get a snapshot of driver activity, to compare behavior from month-to-month or to compare drivers with each other.

Have any questions on how Actsoft can help you?

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11.28
2018

Three Things Successful Fleet Managers Never Do

Managing a fleet of vehicles is a grand task for whoever decides to take it on. In addition to propelling their workforce to specific levels of productivity and efficiency, managers must also ensure the safety of their workforce and encourage the development of positive habits. Below are a few things successful fleet managers never do.

Complicate Fleet Maintenance
In order to maintain the integrity of your fleet, you have to ensure that vehicular maintenance is a simplified process. Complicated processes discourage employees from engaging in them. In this instance, overcomplicating a process will yield the negative result of not servicing your vehicles appropriately.

Make maintaining vehicles nearly effortless for your drivers. Set up reminders to communicate that the vehicles need to be attended to, therefore ensuring a properly maintained fleet.

Be Reactionary to Safety Hazards
Doing this, you assume a great deal of liability on your vehicles, their drivers, and your company as a whole. Not properly educating your drivers on how to address safety issues, or failing to equip them with safe vehicles, increases your company’s susceptibility to the fallout following an accident.

Instead, take a proactive approach toward safety issues. A multi-faceted endeavor, proactivity toward fleet safety includes the tracking of vehicle locations and the scheduling of maintenance alerts prior to service issues occurring. Setting clear guidelines for drivers to follow when facing an event that compromises their vehicle’s safety ensures their response is both quick and direct, reducing the negative impact these issues can have on your processes.

Establish Unclear, Vague, or No Expectations for Fleet Drivers
Failure to set attainable goals for your drivers is a surefire way to inhibit your company’s growth. Without clearly defined productivity expectations, your drivers have greater leeway to misuse company time and you have little-to-no means of holding them accountable.

It is in your best interest to convey what is expected of your driver’s performance. Setting up daily, weekly, and monthly goals give drivers a benchmark to accomplish while on the clock. Communicating that driver behaviors will also be measured is another way to ensure your fleet is operating at optimum efficiency. Speeding, hard accelerations, and hard braking all compound to negatively affect the vehicles within your fleet.

Acknowledging which approaches to fleet management work or not is crucial to the continued success of your own fleet. Learning from the mistakes and achievements of those around you is a proven method for circumventing the obstacles and losses your business can encounter without any form of guidance. Make sure to avoid these three things, and you are that much closer to success.

Have any questions on how Actsoft can help you?

Call (888) 732-6638 or Receive a Live Webinar